Transsexual,Transylvania

Don't get strung out by the way I look,
Don't judge a book by its cover~

ostracizedpoodle:

I don’t need alcohol to make bad decisions

(via redsky-noise)

aloneveganreed:

ghdos:

themochagoddess:

nanodash:

scienceyoucanlove:

These condoms include Vivagel, a new antiviral compound that disables 99.9% of HIV, herpes, and other sexually transmitted viruses:http://bit.ly/1ne3B9V

from Science Alert

Discuss.

Additional, slightly more detailed, article (x). It uses nanotech!

*orders box even though I never have sex..just in case*

Wow.

Are they vegan?

I hung out with my mom today and it was so beautiful. Even though we did yell at each other today, we were both able to acknowledge that we weren’t mad at each other, just really passionate. Granted, we have to stop in mid-conversation to remind each other that we were having a discussion, not an argument, but it’s a huge step for us. I feel like I’m finally starting to forgive her everything that has happened between 13-21. I love my mom, and I’m starting to like her again too. 

So as a reward, I bought her khakis for work and a cherry icee. She was so happy :3

junkculture:

Transparent Figurative Sculptures Made from Metallic Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi

(via redsky-noise)

thegirlwithcaramelskin:

Mane. Mane. Lips.

For the full shoot pick up Txture Mag’s first issue coming this fall!

Model: Amber Jhané (me) thegirlwithcaramelskin
Makeup by IG: i_am_that_limited_edition
Hair by IG: esdotvw
Styling by IG: kimstylesu

(via black-woman)

wildsoulchiild:

fanofallshippers:

icequeen102990:

glampora:

heytheresuckyq:

findinglady:

PLEASE PASS THIS ON! 

I want to make sure every one knows about this and what it can do to your pets 

this is what has happened to my sisters cat after she wore a hartz flea and tick collar and now has a burn like wound on her neck. please pass this on and do not buy hartz’s products! they use poison in their products pets have died because of this!!

http://www.hartzvictims.org/

Yes this is my cat she is doing fine at the moment but I’m so sorry for the people who’s pets are not so lucky

oh my god

PLEASE REBLOG THIS PEOPLE

save pets!

Hartz is the worse EVER! my aunt used it and it ended up killing two of her cats. only one survived but she had the worse skin condition. NEVER USE HARTZ

BETTER REBLOG THISS!!!

Guys this is an actual issue. We had Hartz collars for my dog and he kept having seizures. one seizure he had on the stairs and fell backwards down the stairs, and he also stop breathing from these seizures. When I found out about Hartz causing this I took it off my dog and he hasn’t had a seizure since. And he used to have one at least every few months. DON’T USE HARTZ.

(via aloneveganreed)

bromancing-the-stone:

platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

Science

(via bigmexicanman)

angrywocunited:

lipstick-feminists:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)
This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.
Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

angrywocunited:

lipstick-feminists:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)

This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.

Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

team-lads-in-the-tardis:

i cant stop laughing help

team-lads-in-the-tardis:

i cant stop laughing help

(via asparagus-hotpants)

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

(via asparagus-hotpants)